ITV's Britain's Favourite Walks: Top 100

The best of Britain and NI as voted by you

Pull on your hiking boots for a countdown of Britain’s favourite walks. Based on the results of the largest survey ever conducted into the UK’s hiking habits, here are the top 100 routes as voted for by more than 8,000 walking enthusiasts.

Britain's Favourite Walks - Top 100 logoYou will find details on each of the walks below - click to open the route in OS Maps and this could be the start of your next big adventure in the beautiful British outdoors.

The program was first broadcast on ITV on Tuesday 30th January at 7.30pm,but you can watch to see Julia Bradbury and Ore Oduba on ITV Player while the program is still available.

Select a route from the map to see more detail.

 

Scotland

43Arthur's Seat - 5.24km (3.3 miles)

Difficulty: Easy - Map: OS Explorer 350

This walk takes you to the ultimate vantage point over the Scottish capital. The plug of an extinct volcano, the hill and its outlying ramparts soar 251m above the medieval roofscape of the Royal Mile, providing a view that’s as revelatory as any in the country.
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12Ben MacDui - 29.02km (18 miles)

Difficulty: Challenging - Map: OS Explorer OL57

Ben MacDui is Britain’s second highest peak and unlike Ben Nevis, is situated in a vast wilderness. A good walk starts from the Linn of Dee. There are plenty of easy routes around the estate but, those wanting a real challenge lace up and head for the summit of Ben MacDui.
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15Ben Nevis - 14.98km (9.3 miles)

Difficulty: Challenging - Map: OS Explorer 392

Affectionately known as The Ben; this is the highest mountain in the British Isles. This ascent takes you to the summit via the well-made Mountain Track (Pony Track) but people with serious mountain skills may consider the very challenging Carn Mor Dearg Arete route.
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94Falkirk Wheel & The Kelpies - 6.67km (4.1 miles)

Difficulty: Easy - Map: OS Explorer 349

This is an easy 4 mile canter along the canal starting at the only rotating boatlift in the world and finishing at the largest equine sculptures in the world, known as the Kelpies. Linking the two is a specially created ‘selfie trail’ making it the perfect walk for families.
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62Fife Coastal Path - 175km (108.7 miles)

Difficulty: Easy - Maps: OS Explorer 367, 370

This is one of Scotland’s great trails; stretching for 108 miles from the Firth of Forth in the south, to the Firth of Tay in the north, the route offers an unrivalled walking experience. Don’t miss the famous Forth Bridge.
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64Great Glen Way - 119.27km (74.1 miles)

Difficulty: Moderate - Maps: OS Explorer 400, 416

This National Long Distance Walking Route travels from Fort William to Inverness along the Great Glen Fault. There are 74 miles of path, track, canal and loch to discover following closely the line of the Caledonian Canal. The majority of this route is accessible for users of all abilities.
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38Pitlochry to Blair Athol - 12.6km (7.8 miles)

Difficulty: Easy - Map: OS Explorer OL49

Pitlochry is one of the most popular resorts in the Highlands, famous for its Dam and Fish Ladder. This walk follows the River Garry from the town to the highland village of Blair Atholl.
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65Silver Sands of Morar - 3.2km (2 miles)

Difficulty: Easy - Map: OS Explorer 398

A stroll along the Silver Sands of Morar gives walkers the chance to experience Scotland’s answer to the Caribbean. The silvery sands and crystal clear waters were made famous by the film ‘Local Hero’. Mostly accessible at low tide, with some scrambling over rocks, but can also be reached from the road.
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22Stac Pollaidh - 3.77km (2.3 miles)

Difficulty: Moderate - Map: OS Explorer 442

One of the most visited peaks in the Western Highlands, this walk involves a strenuous climb then a bit of a tricky scramble to its steep pinnacled ridge - but it’s worth it for the spectacular panoramic views.
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33The Fairy Pools - 7.19km (4.5 miles)

Difficulty: Moderate - Map: OS Explorer 411

These famous pools and waterfalls near Glenbrittle sit at the foot of the fearsome Black Cuillin Mountains - some of the most spectacular and challenging mountains in the UK. There’s a short walk around the pools but routes can easily be extended to the surrounding hills and mountains for stunning views.
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88The Falls of Clyde - 10.53km (6.5 miles)

Difficulty: Easy - Map: OS Explorer 335

The ancient gorge woodland of the Clyde Valley is one of Scotland's oldest and richest forests. The path through the Falls of Clyde runs along a gorge oak woodland that is home to wildlife including badgers, otters, bats and dippers.
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14West Highland Way - 154.1km (95.8 miles)

Difficulty: Moderate - Maps: OS Explorer 392, 384, 377, OL39, OL38

The first officially designated Long Distance Footpath in Scotland, this trail runs from Milngavie, just outside Glasgow, to Fort William taking in some of Scotland’s best loved landscapes: Loch Lomond, Ben Lomond, Rannoch Moor, Buachaille Etive Mor, Glencoe, and Glen Nevis. Hugely popular, it can be done as a whole or just tackled in sections.
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Presenter Julia Bradbury with OS GetOutside Champion Zoe Holmes

Presenter Julia Bradbury with OS GetOutside Champion Zoe Holmes

Filming in Glencoe - © Zoe Homes

Filming in Glencoe - © Zoe Homes

Glencoe - © Zoe Homes

Glencoe - © Zoe Homes

The Fairy Pools - © Richard Croft via Geograph (Creative Commons)

The Fairy Pools - © Richard Croft via Geograph (Creative Commons)

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Wales

Llanberis path, Snowdon - © Gareth James via Geograph (Creative Commons)

Llanberis path, Snowdon - © Gareth James via Geograph (Creative Commons)

Cemlyn Bay - © Ian Capper via Georgraph (Creative Commons)

Cemlyn Bay - © Ian Capper via Georgraph (Creative Commons)

Sgwd y Pannwr, Four Falls Walk - © Stuart Wilding via Geograph (Creative Commons)

Sgwd y Pannwr, Four Falls Walk - © Stuart Wilding via Geograph (Creative Commons)

Tryfan, shown in the the OS Maps Aerial 3D layer

Tryfan, shown in the the OS Maps Aerial 3D layer

32Anglesey Coastal Walk - 209km (129.9 miles)

Difficulty: Moderate - Map: OS Explorer OL17

Beautiful beaches and villages, fascinating geology and history and a number of nature reserves are to be found on this popular 130 mile route that takes you right around the island coast.
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31Beddgelert - 7.7km (4.8 miles)

Difficulty: Moderate - Map: OS Explorer OL17

Starting in one of Snowdonia’s prettiest villages this walk takes you through the dramatic valley and ends at a tribute to the legendary tale of Gelert the faithful hound.
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40Four Falls Walk, Brecon Beacons - 7.1km (4.4 miles)

Difficulty: Moderate - Map: OS Explorer OL12

Tucked away in the southern slopes of the Fforest Fawr massif, west of Merthyr Tydfil, Waterfall Country is part of the Brecon Beacons National Park. This exciting gorge walk takes in four of the best - the upper and lower Clun-Gwyn, the Pannwr and the Eira falls.
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60Llangollen Canal - 12km (7.5 miles)

Difficulty: Easy - Map: OS Explorer 255

The Llangollen Canal crosses the border between England and Wales. Its combination of picturesque countryside and breath-taking engineering draws visitors from far and wide.
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41Offa's Dyke - 278km (172.7 miles)

Difficulty: Moderate - Maps: OS Explorer 214, 215

One of Britain’s longest ancient monuments and guides the 177 mile route: traversing the border up the Wye Valley to Monmouth, past Hay-on-Wye into the Shropshire hills then Clwydian Hills that give way to Prestatyn. The Wye Valley section is popular, starting in Chepstow and finishing at Monmouth.
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11Pen y Fan - 7.59km (4.7 miles)

Difficulty: Moderate - Map: OS Explorer OL12

The Beacons feel unlike any other hills in the UK thanks to their unique plateaued summits and Pen y Fan is the highest peak in South Wales. There are various routes including the ‘lungbuster’ - the SAS favourite. This is a slightly less challenging circuit but still expect a strenuous walk.
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28Rhossili - 11.7km (7.3 miles)

Difficulty: Easy - Map: OS Explorer 164

Visit when the sun is shining and you’ll be treated to sparkling blue-green water and miles of sand. There are various trails offering fantastic views and a landscape rich in mythology and history.
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2Snowdon - 14.7km (9.1 miles)

Difficulty: Moderate - Map: OS Explorer OL17

Snowdon is the highest peak in Wales and is one of the most popular summits in the British Isles. There are seven official routes to the top varying in difficulty; but this route takes one of the most popular, the Llanberis Path.
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16Solva - 7.26km (4.5 miles)

Difficulty: Easy - Map: OS Explorer OL35

St Davids - Follow this section of the Wales Coastal Path to explore the pastel painted village of Solva. Take time to explore the harbour and unspoiled coastline. For a longer walk, head for the UK’s smallest city, St David’s.
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6Tryfan - 9.2km (5.7 miles)

Difficulty: Challenging - Map: OS Explorer OL17

Snowdon for the hardcore hillwalkers. This one is for those with plenty of determination, experience and the right kit. Keep your eye out for the feral goats that seem to have no difficulty scaling it’s rocky peaks.
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North East England

55Alnmouth Beach and Warkworth - 10.7km (6.6 miles)

Difficulty: Easy - Map: OS Explorer 332

Take a walk along the coastline, starting in the town of Alnmouth and ending with the phenomenal Warkworth Castle. The bay has miles of golden sand and is located on the mouth of the River Aln.
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9Dunstanburgh Castle - 12km (7.5 miles)

Difficulty: Easy - Map: OS Explorer 332

This walk is a real Northumbrian highlight...the short but spectacular coastal stroll which sets foot from the fishing village of Craster, before visiting the mighty ruins of Dunstanburgh Castle.
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93Durham Coastal Path - 18.1km (11.2 miles)

Difficulty: Easy - Map: OS Explorer 308

The Durham Coastal path starts in Crimdon and ends in Seaham and most of this 11 mile stretch of coast is a designated National Nature Reserve helping protect its wildlife and natural habitat.
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34High Force - 13.82km (8.6 miles)

Difficulty: Easy - Maps: OS Explorer OL19, OL31

An enjoyable circular route in the heart of the rugged Durham Dales which takes in both High Force and Low Force Falls along the River Tees.
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59Kielder Water - 29km (18 miles)

Difficulty: Easy - Map: OS Explorer OL42

In addition to hosting the biggest man made lake in Northern Europe, a variety of wildlife and vast ‘working’ woodlands this beautiful place has recently become a designated ‘Dark Sky Park’ so this is also a great walk if you like stargazing.
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51St Cuthbert's Way (Pilgrim's Route to Lindisfarne) - 100km (62.1 miles)

Difficulty: Easy - Maps: OS Explorer OL16, 339

There are various walks on St Cuthbert’s 62.5 mile pilgrimage trail. You can either take on the whole thing across a few days or, for a shorter walk, follow the iconic poles across the sand to Holy Island at low tide.
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48The Cheviot - 15km (9.3 miles)

Difficulty: Challenging - Map: OS Explorer OL16

This is a strenuous but rewarding walk over the the long trail of hills straddling the England-Scotland border, with steep ascents and descents...but there are also lots of easier routes to enjoy the hills.
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18The Hadrian’s Wall Path - 10.4km (6.5 miles)

Difficulty: Easy - Map: OS Explorer OL43

A UNESCO World Heritage Site, Hadrian’s Wall was the North West frontier of the Roman Empire. The wall itself stretches for 84 miles and forms part of the Pennine Way. This walk follows the wall along a 3 mile section from Housesteads Roman fort to Steel Rigg and offers some fantastic views.
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Great Gatehouse, Dunstanburgh Castle - © Andrew Curtis via Geograph (Creative Commons)

Great Gatehouse, Dunstanburgh Castle - © Andrew Curtis via Geograph (Creative Commons)

Benny Shank shelter: an exhibit on the sculpture trail which serves as a shelter - © Richard Webb vie Geograph (Creative Commons)

Benny Shank shelter: an exhibit on the sculpture trail which serves as a shelter - © Richard Webb vie Geograph (Creative Commons)

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North West England

Julia Bradbury on top of Helvellyn © ITV

Julia Bradbury on top of Helvellyn © ITV

"The fleeting hour of life of those who love the hills is quickly spent, but the hills are eternal. Always there will be the lonely ridge, the dancing beck, the silent forest; always there will be the exhilaration of the summits. These are for the seeking, and those who seek and find while there is still time will be blessed both in mind and body."

Alfred Wainwright, author of Pictorial Guide to the Lakeland Fells
'Another Place' by Sir Antony Gormley -  © Karl and Ali via Geograph (Creative Commons

'Another Place' by Sir Antony Gormley - © Karl and Ali via Geograph (Creative Commons)

82Another Place by Antony Gormley - 8.2km (5.1 miles)

Difficulty: Easy - Map: OS Explorer 275

‘Another Place’ consists of 100 cast-iron life-size figures by British sculptor Sir Antony Gormley spread out along three kilometres of the foreshore, stretching almost one kilometre out to sea. The starting point for this walk is the nearby Waterloo station.
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7Buttermere - 7km (4.3 miles)

Difficulty: Easy - Map: OS Explorer OL4

Buttermere Valley is a tranquil area of dramatic fells, farms and woodland, encompassing three lakes. Buttermere (the lake) offers one of the best round-the-lake walks in the Lake District and the views mean that your photos make it look like you've been somewhere much more rugged!
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4Cat Bells - 5km (3.1 miles)

Difficulty: Moderate - Map: OS Explorer OL4

A small yet iconic fell that is popular with families due to its compact’ size. It dominates the view across Derwent from Borrowdale and is dubbed ‘The Lair of the Wildcat’. There are plenty of ways to the top but this classic route is over the bumps of the North Ridge.
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27Coffin Route, Ambleside - 6.3km (3.9 miles)

Difficulty: Easy - Map: OS Explorer OL7

Starting in the village of Ambleside this route follows the route used to carry coffins on their final journey to St Oswald’s Church in Grasmere. In addition to beautiful views and tumbling streams, it also takes in two former homes of poet William Wordsworth.
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67Forest of Bowland - 11km (6.8 miles)

Difficulty: Easy - Map: OS Explorer OL41

This Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty covers 312 square miles of moorland, lowland, rivers and villages. A favourite walk here takes in the trail around Stocks Reservoir which passes through the Gisburn Forest.
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1Helvellyn - 16.3km (10.1 miles)

Difficulty: Challenging - Map: OS Explorer OL5

This is England’s third highest peak and is a walk for those with a decent level of fitness. The infamous ‘Striding Edge’ is a challenging ridge walk but this route leaves from the village of Glenridding before ascending the summit - and it’s spectacular views - via the Keppel Cove approach.
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30High Cup Nick - 15.6km (9.7 miles)

Difficulty: Challenging - Maps: OS Explorer OL19, OL31

This mountain has been dubbed ‘The Grand Canyon of the Pennines' and is one of the finest u-shaped glacier carved valleys in England. There are fantastic views from the summit taking in the dramatic geological formation at the top of High Cup Gill.
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8Old Man of Coniston - 12km (7.5 miles)

Difficulty: Challenging - Map: OS Explorer OL6

A moderate/challenging walk on one of the best known mountains in the Lake District. The hike to the summit starts and ends from the village of Coniston below and is well worth the effort to reach the top for some stunning views.
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70Sandstone Trail - 54.4km (33.8 miles)

Difficulty: Moderate - Maps: OS Explorer 257, 267

This route stretches for 34 miles (55 km) and you can take a number of routes varying in difficulty and length but all offer spectacular views. Dont miss Delamere forest - the largest woodland in Cheshire, Beeston Castle and the historic market towns of Frodsham and Whitchurch.
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5Scafell Pike - 11.6km (7.2 miles)

Difficulty: Challenging - Maps: OS Explorer OL4, OL6

England’s highest mountain provides those braving the summit with spectacular views of the surrounding fells. It also forms part of the national Three Peaks Challenge. This route to the top is a circular hike from Wasdale Head.
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86Witches Trail - 11.1km (6.9 miles)

Difficulty: Easy - Maps: OS Explorer OL21, OL41

The picturesque villages nestled in the shadows of the infamous Pendle Hill have a dark history of intrigue and witchcraft. This route starts at the Pendle Heritage Centre and loops around those villages that were at the centre of the most infamous witch trial in British history.
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More walks in North West England

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Yorkshire & The Humber

50Bempton Cliffs - 18.8km (11.7 miles)

Difficulty: Moderate - Maps: OS Explorer 301, 295

A fascinating mix of nature and history, this walk takes you across the towering chalk cliffs offering spectacular views of the UK’s largest mainland seabird colony and the wild North Sea below. See the remains of the RAF radio station, the haunting shipwrecks along the coast and the lighthouse at Flamborough Head.
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49Brimham Rocks - 6.5km (4 miles)

Difficulty: Moderate - Map: OS Explorer 298

One of the north of England’s natural wonders, the rocks are a mass of giant gritstone boulders eroded into strange forms. There are a range of trails around the area but the route from the village of Pateley Bridge is a walk which takes you along rivers, moors, valleys and woodlands.
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69Bronte Way - 13.4km (8.3 miles)

Difficulty: Moderate - Maps: OS Explorer OL21, 297

Set off from the village of Haworth where the Bronte sisters lived and wrote and walk along the landscapes that feature in their stories. See waterfalls and wildlife along this famous route before visiting Top Withens, the ruined farmhouse thought to be an inspiration for Wuthering Heights.
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61Grassington - 15.3km (9.5 miles)

Difficulty: Moderate - Map: OS Explorer OL2

There are many walks around the pretty village of Grassington. Take this route from Grassington to Conistone to see Linton Falls, Kilnsey Crag, Conistone Dib and the River Wharfe.
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39Grosmont - 5.2km (3.2 miles)

Difficulty: Easy - Map: OS Explorer OL27

Moors, waterfalls, standing stones and even a heritage railway make Goathland a popular location with walkers and filmmakers; Heartbeat and Harry Potter were filmed here. You can follow the route from Grosmont to Goathland over the moors and travel the North York Moors railway route back.
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25Ingleborough - 18.1km (11.2 miles)

Difficulty: Challenging - Map: OS Explorer OL2

This is the second highest peak in the legendary Three Peaks challenge. Whernside takes the title for the biggest with Pen-y-ghent coming in third. There are several popular walking routes to the summit but the roundabout route from Clapham that takes in a number of interesting features including Trow Gill and Gaping Gill was described by Wainwright as, 'the finest of all, a classic.'
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36Ingleton Falls - 7km (4.3 miles)

Difficulty: Easy - Map: OS Explorer OL2

This circular waterfall walk features several spectacular falls and is a designated Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) so look out for rare plants, birds and trees.
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81Liverpool Canal - 25.6km (15.9 miles)

Difficulty: Easy - Map: OS Explorer OL21

A popular section along this 127 mile canal route includes a visit to Saltaire, a designated UNESCO World Heritage site. On the outskirts of Keighley you can see the Bingley Five-Rise Locks, one of the ‘Seven Wonders of the Waterways’.
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3Malham and Gordale Scar - 12.2km (7.6 miles)

Difficulty: Moderate - Maps: OS Explorer OL2, OL41

This popular route covers the dramatic landscape of Malham Cove, Gordale Scar, Janet’s Foss Waterfall and Malham Tarn - Britain’s highest lake. Travel through varied terrain and rugged landscapes. A less strenuous route is from Malham Village to Janet’s Foss.
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23Roseberry Topping - 10.1km (6.3 miles)

Difficulty: Moderate - Map: OS Explorer OL26

Roseberry Topping is a famous and distinctive hill. This loop begins with a visit to nearby Captain Cook’s monument before the ascent on the sandstone peak known as the mini-Matterhorn.
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17Whitby - 11km (6.8 miles)

Difficulty: Moderate - Map: OS Explorer OL27

Walk from the picturesque seaside town of Whitby and the dramatic gothic abbey to the old smuggler’s haunt of Robin Hood’s Bay.
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54Yorkshire Coast to Coast Path, Richmond to Reeth - 16.9km (10.5 miles)

Difficulty: Moderate - Maps: OS Explorer OL30, 304, 302

You can follow Wainwright’s famous 192 mile trail all the way from St Bees in Cumbria to Robin Hood’s Bay in North Yorkshire...or drop onto it in more manageable stages. This popular section of the route is from Reeth downstream via the River Swale to the historic town of Richmond.
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Roseberry Topping - © Keith Evans vie Geograph (Creative Commons)

Roseberry Topping - © Keith Evans vie Geograph (Creative Commons)

"This is a lovely place. The little river, the Esk, runs through a deep valley, which broadens out as it comes near the harbour. A great viaduct runs across, with high piers, through which the view seems somehow further away than it really is. The valley is beautifully green, and it is so steep that when you are on the high land on either side you look right across it"

Whitby, as described by Bram Stroker in his gothic novel 'Dracula'
Leeds & Liverpool Canal, Red Rock - © David Dixon via Geograph (Creative Commons)

Leeds & Liverpool Canal, Red Rock - © David Dixon via Geograph (Creative Commons)

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East Midlands

Commemorative plaque of mass trespass of Kinder Scout at Bowden Bridge Quarry -    © Marcin Floryan, Creative Commons (WikiCommons)

Commemorative plaque of mass trespass of Kinder Scout at Bowden Bridge Quarry - © Marcin Floryan, Creative Commons (WikiCommons)

Katherine Kelly at the Trig Pillar on the summit of Mam Tor - © ITV Picture Desk

Katherine Kelly at the Trig Pillar on the summit of Mam Tor - © ITV Picture Desk

85Bradgate Park - 17.1km (10.6 miles)

Difficulty: Easy - Maps: OS Explorer 245, 233

This park was first enclosed as a park around 800 years ago. The circular hike here skirts around most of the beautiful 850 acres and passes through Swithland Wood. When you visit look out for the 400 deer that roam free through the park.
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26Dovedale to Milldale - 5.0km (3.1 miles)

Difficulty: Moderate - Maps: OS Explorer OL24, OL259

Dovedale may be known for its rivers and spectacular limestone gorge but other attractions include the wonderful stepping stones, curious caves, Thorpe Cloud and the free standing towers of Ilam Rock and Pinnacle Tor.
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21Kinder Scout - 17.8km (11.1 miles)

Difficulty: Challenging - Map: OS Explorer OL1

Kinder Scout is the highest point in the Peaks and will forever be synonymous with the Kinder mass trespass and the start of the access movement. It is one of the most challenging yet rewarding walks in the Peaks starting in Edale, also the start of the infamous Pennine Way.
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10Mam Tor - 10.7km (6.6 miles)

Difficulty: Moderate - Map: OS Explorer OL1

A walk in the Peaks over one of it’s most fascinating hills - Mam Tor. The walk then continues over The Great Ridge that separates the Vales of Edale and Castleton. With this route you start and end in Castleton but there are shorter routes up Mam Tor.
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96Nine Ladies - 5km (3.1 miles)

Difficulty: Easy - Map: OS Explorer OL24

This short walk features a visit to a small early Bronze Age stone circle believed to depict nine ladies turned to stone as a penalty for dancing on Sunday. It is part of a complex of 70 prehistoric circles and standing stones on Stanton Moor. The graffiti carved on the King Stone, which includes the name ‘Bill Stumps’, is also mentioned in The Pickwick Papers by Charles Dickens.
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35Stanage Edge - 7.1km (4.4 miles)

Difficulty: Moderate - Maps: OS Explorer OL1, 278

This is a popular outdoor location for walkers of average fitness to experience the many delights of the Peak District. This route starts at the Hollin Bank car park and takes you up onto the Edge for panoramic views of Derbyshire.
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More walks in the East Midlands

  • Bakewell & Chatsworth by Derbyshire Life
  • Peak Venues provides luxury self catering holidays in the Peak District National Park and has a selection of top quality walks listed within their activities.

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West Midlands

79Cannock Chase - 19.1km (11.9 miles)

Difficulty: Moderate - Map: OS Explorer 244

The Chase was designated an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty because of it’s beautiful landscape, history and wildlife. The 12 mile Sherbrook trail takes in the picturesque Sherbrook Valley with its mixture of woodlands and open heathland.
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44Carding Mill Valley and the Long Mynd - 15.3km (9.5 miles)

Difficulty: Moderate - Maps: OS Explorer 217, 216, 241

This route is a near 10 mile yomp through the gorgeous wildlife-rich heathland which features throughout the Long Mynd and Carding Mill Valley.
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37The Malverns - 8.9km (5.5 miles)

Difficulty: Moderate - Map: OS Explorer 190

The Malverns divide the beautiful English countryside of Herefordshire and Worcestershire and have inspired poets from John Drinkwater to WH Auden. There are a number of routes for ramblers of all ages and abilities but the highlight on this walk is a hike to the top of the 425 metre Worcestershire Beacon.
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53The Roaches - 5.4km (3.4 miles)

Difficulty: Easy - Maps: OS Explorer OL24, 268

This easy route in The Roaches, a dramatic gritstone ridge perched high above the Peak District, leads you through an unusual landscape featuring strange rock formations, coupled with panoramic views and dramatic cliffs.
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78The Stiperstones to the Devil's Chair - 7.6km (4.7 miles)

Difficulty: Easy - Maps: OS Explorer 216, 217, 241

Not only does this hike feature some remarkable geology it also takes you through the natural habitat for the world’s fastest animal, the mighty Peregrine falcon.
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91Worcester & Birmingham Canal Walk - 50km (31.1 miles)

Difficulty: Easy - Maps: OS Explorer 204, 219

This 30 mile route follows the towpath from the vibrant centre of Birmingham, through the green hills of Worcestershire, to the cathedral city of Worcester.
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Stiperstones rocks - © Dave Croker via Geograph (Creative Commons)

Stiperstones rocks - © Dave Croker via Geograph (Creative Commons)

At its' peak Birmingham had around 160 miles (257 km) of canals. Today just over 100 miles (160 km) are still navigable

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East England

The Tower, Walton on the Naze - © Christine Matthews via Geograph (Creative Commons)

The Tower, Walton on the Naze - © Christine Matthews via Geograph (Creative Commons)

"The snaking, raised embankments of the fens and the gentle swells of the hills open up ever-changing vistas and you rarely have to walk far to enjoy a completely different scene"

Dennis and Jan Kelsall in OS Pathfinder Guide to Norfolk

68Blakeney Point - 12km (7.5 miles)

Difficulty: Easy - Map: OS Explorer 251

This coastal walk is a fantastic one for wildlife fans. It takes in a beautiful sand and shingle spit which during breeding season is a playground for a colony of 500 seals.
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84Cambridge Colleges and the Backs - 7.6km (4.7 miles)

Difficulty: Easy - Maps: OS Explorer 225, 229

This is the perfect route for anyone visiting Cambridge who would like to take in some of the best sights the city has to offer including the University of Cambridge’s colleges and impressive churches, including the Holy Trinity and Great St Mary’s and the Fitzwilliam Museum.
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77Flatford and Constable Country walking trail - 11.3km (7 miles)

Difficulty: Moderate - Maps: OS Explorer 184, 196, 197

Explore the picturesque Stour Valley and Dedham Vale made famous by the paintings of 18th century England’s foremost landscape artist John Constable. This route is a ramble from Manningtree through the quintessential English vistas of Flatford.
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71Peddars Way and Norfolk Coast Path - 133.7km (83.1 miles)

Difficulty: Easy - Maps: OS Explorer 238, 252

Follow a section of this 83 mile National Trail which runs from Hunstanton east to Hopton-On-Sea. En route at Holme Dunes there’s even a chance of a close encounter with the endangered Natterjack toad.
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42Wells-next-the-Sea - 13.6km (8.5 miles)

Difficulty: Easy - Map: OS Explorer 251

Wells is one of the most attractive towns on the North Norfolk Coast. This saunter along the shore has miles of sandy beaches as well as pine woodland walks and funky beach huts to explore.
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London

90Regent's Canal - 14.5km (9 miles)

Difficulty: Easy - Map: OS Explorer 161

The Regent’s Canal is one of London’s best-kept secrets - a peaceful haven often hidden by the surrounding buildings. The towpath runs from Little Venice through Regents Park to the River Thames taking in some of the top attractions the capital city has on offer.
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98Richmond Park - 11.1km (6.9 miles)

Difficulty: Easy - Map: OS Explorer 161

The largest of London’s Royal Parks, Richmond is home to a vast array of wildlife living in its varied landscape of woodland, grasslands, gardens and bogs. Walks can take a varied route with varying degrees of accessibility but this route covers a full circuit of the park’s perimeter.
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63Thames Path - 31km (19.3 miles)

Difficulty: Easy - Maps: OS Explorer 161, 173

Following the full Thames Path for 184 miles from the river’s source to sea this National Trail takes in the Cotswold Countryside, the city spires of Oxford, and Hampton Court. This particular stage of the path from Putney bridge to the Thames Barrier puts walkers in the heart of the capital with great views of Parliament, the London Eye, Tate Modern, Tower Bridge, and St Paul's cathedral.
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Deer and fawn, Richmond Park - © Philip Halling via Geograph (Creative Commons)

Deer and fawn, Richmond Park - © Philip Halling via Geograph (Creative Commons)

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South East England

The South Downs Way - © Trevor Harris vie Geograph (Creative Commons)

The South Downs Way - © Trevor Harris vie Geograph (Creative Commons)

"And above all, watch with glittering eyes the whole world around you because the greatest secrets are always hidden in the most unlikely places. Those who don't believe in magic will never find it."

Roal Dahl in his last published children's' story, 'The Minpins.'
GetOutside Champions Shell and Gav Grayston of 'Get Out With The Kids' filming with TV presenter Ore Oduba

GetOutside Champions Shell and Gav Grayston of 'Get Out With The Kids' filming with TV presenter Ore Oduba

Julia Bradbury with Ore Oduba on the South Downs in East Sussex - © ITV Picture Desk

Julia Bradbury with Ore Oduba on the South Downs in East Sussex - © ITV Picture Desk

76Devils Punchbowl - 5.52km (3.4 miles)

Difficulty: Moderate - Map: OS Explorer 145

The Devil's Punchbowl is a large hollow of dry sandy heath to the west of Hindhead in southern England. The route here is a short hike through the natural amphitheatre that’s a well known haven for wildlife...so look out for rare beetles and butterflies.
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75Great Missenden - 15.3km (9.5 miles)

Difficulty: Easy - Maps: OS Explorer 171, 172, 181

Roald Dahl lived in Great Missenden and many features of the village are recognisable in his stories. For a full day’s walk, take the village trail before heading to Angling Spring woods where Dahl walked himself for inspiration. After that head up to Coombe Hill, the highest viewpoint in the Chilterns where you can see the Prime Minister’s country retreat at Chequers.
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72Leith Hill - 13.9km (8.6 miles)

Difficulty: Moderate - Maps: OS Explorer 145, 146

Leith Hill is the highest point in south east England and offers spectacular views. Take in charming Surrey mill hamlets, hammer ponds and the gothic folly at the top of the hill.
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99Oxford City Walk - 3.72km (2.3 miles)

Difficulty: Easy - Map: OS Explorer 180

Oxford is packed with fascinating history, architecture and many eating and drinking establishments. This walk lets you explore some of its most famous sites. See how many film locations you can spot along the way.
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100Ramsgate to Margate - 12.8km (8 miles)

Difficulty: Easy - Map: OS Explorer 150

This is a fairly easy walk linking the three historical coastal towns along the Viking Coastal Trail. It provides excellent cliff top views but you can walk along the beach and explore hidden coves if the tide is out as well as discovering links to both Charles Dickens and J.M.W. Turner.
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89Rye and Camber Sands - 17.4km (10.8 miles)

Difficulty: Easy - Map: OS Explorer 124

This lovely walk takes you around Rye Harbour Nature Reserve on the Sussex coast. There's great scenery with a wide range of habitats and spectacular wildlife. You can also continue the walk through to the sweeping sands at Camber.
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13South Downs Way - 162km (100.7 miles)

Difficulty: Moderate - Maps: OS Explorer OL32, OL8, OL10, OL11, OL25

The South Downs Way follows the old drovers paths along the high ground of the Downs between Winchester and Eastbourne. One hundred miles long, it is accessible along its length, with no stiles to clamber over. Highlights include The Seven Sisters, Beachy Head, Devil's Dyke, Jack and Jill Windmills, Ditchling Beacon and Chanctonbury Ring.
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29The Needles - 7.7km (4.8 miles)

Difficulty: Moderate - Map: OS Explorer OL29

These truly iconic group of rocks and the surrounding area offer a walk steeped in beauty and history. Take in a 19th-century fort, a cold war rocket test site and the memorial to Alfred, Lord Tennyson, the Victorian Poet Laureate.
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46The Ridgeway - 138km (85.7 miles)

Difficulty: Moderate - Map: OS Explorer 170

The Ridgeway is a long distance walk which takes in some of our best known ancient landmarks, from the Avebury stones, to the White Horse at Uffington, with the route reaching its climactic end at Ivinghoe Beacon. It’s another of our National Trails and is 87 miles long, though it can be easily accessed and walked in shorter sections.
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80White Cliffs of Dover - 15.8km (9.8 miles)

Difficulty: Easy - Map: OS Explorer 138

The cliffs are a famous iconic British landmark but in addition to breathtaking views across the channel, this walk offers plenty of fascinating wildlife and history, including a visit to one of Henry VIII’s castles.
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More walks in South East England

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South West England

52Bath - 9.2km (5.7 miles)

Difficulty: Easy - Map: OS Explorer 155

A short walk through historic Bath features stunning views, hidden waterways and Georgian architecture in a city that has been recognised as a World Heritage Site.
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57Bowerman’s Nose - 15.7km (9.8 miles)

Difficulty: Moderate - Map: OS Explorer OL28

This is an open, gently undulating walk on moorland that inspired Sir Arthur Conan Doyle to create The Hound of the Baskervilles. This walking loop starts out from rock formation Bowerman’s Nose before heading south towards Hound Tor, a deserted medieval village.
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73Broadway Tower - 6.7km (4.2 miles)

Difficulty: Easy - Map: OS Explorer OL45

On the Cotswolds Way National Trail, a popular circular route from Broadway village takes in this great viewpoint over Worcestershire to Wales. The brainchild of landscape architect Capability Brown, it was the home of artists William Morris and Edward Burne Jones.
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58Brockenhurst - 5.2km (3.2 miles)

Difficulty: Easy - Map: OS Explorer OL22

This simple stroll is a rambling trail taking in the ancient woodlands in the New Forest. The route here includes the Rhinefield Ornamental Drive which features some of Britain’s oldest trees.
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83Clifton Suspension Bridge - 10.8km (6.7 miles)

Difficulty: Easy - Map: OS Explorer 155

This Clifton Suspension Bridge walk goes both over and under the famous span across the Avon Gorge, the handiwork of illustrious Victorian engineer Isambard Kingdom Brunel. You can also see the floating harbour home of SS Great Britain and Britain's best preserved Norman chapterhouse with its magnificent Georgian architecture.
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92Gloucester & Sharpness Canal - 25.6km (15.9 miles)

Difficulty: Easy - Map: OS Explorer OL14

This walk follows the waterway that connects the Roman city of Gloucester to the English port of Sharpness. When it was built in the 1800’s it was the broadest and deepest canal in the world. On the walk there are spectacular views of the Severn Estuary, the Forest of Dean and the Cotswolds.
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20Lizard Peninsula - 12.4km (7.7 miles)

Difficulty: Moderate - Map: OS Explorer 103

This a ramble which takes a loop around the most southerly point of mainland Britain, the Lizard Peninsular. It features dramatic coastal scenery, fascinating history and sandy beaches.
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47Mawgan Porth to Harlyn - 17.7km (11 miles)

Difficulty: Moderate - Map: OS Explorer 106

This route meanders past perfect sandy beaches, a succession of picture-perfect coves, dramatic cliffs with distinctive marine flora and also takes in the dramatic rock stacks of Bedruthan.
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19Old Harry Rocks - 15.8km (9.8 miles)

Difficulty: Moderate - Map: OS Explorer OL15

A great coastal walk to one of the most famous landmarks on the Jurassic Coast - the Old Harry Rocks chalk stacks on Studland. An example of the British coastline at its best.
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24St Ives to Zennor - 19.4km (12.1 miles)

Difficulty: Moderate - Map: OS Explorer 102

This is a walk along a popular stretch of the 630 mile South West Coastal Path. St Ives to Zennor is a dramatic coastal walk where on the way you’ll find a picturesque fishing harbour, rolling surf, sandy bays and wildlife all along a rocky shore.
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74St Mary's, Scilly - 15.8km (9.8 miles)

Difficulty: Easy - Map: OS Explorer 101

This is a 10 mile circuit around the coast of the largest island in the Isles of Scilly. The island is a designated Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty with beautiful coastal scenery and diverse wildlife. A highlight is the viewing tower, lighthouse and rock formations at Peninnis Head.
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87Stonehenge - 10.3km (6.4 miles)

Difficulty: Easy - Map: OS Explorer 130

There are over a thousand surviving stone circles in the UK and this atmospheric amble leads you from the town of Amesbury to the nation’s most iconic. It also features the chance to approach the stones via The Avenue, the ancient processional route used by walkers over 5000 years ago.
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Clifton suspension bridge - © John Winder via Geograph (Creative Commons)

Clifton suspension bridge - © John Winder via Geograph (Creative Commons)

Bowermans Nose and the Two Blondes - © Chris Simpson

Bowermans Nose and the Two Blondes - © Chris Simpson

GetOutside Champions The Two Blondes filming for the program - © Chris Simpson

GetOutside Champions The Two Blondes filming for the program - © Chris Simpson

Learn more about Dartmoor in 'The Non Story of Ignatius Bowerman' by Fi Derby of The Two Blondes

Learn more about Dartmoor in 'The Non Story of Ignatius Bowerman' by Fi Derby of The Two Blondes

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Northern Ireland

Beaghmore stone circles  - © Robert Ashby via Geograph (Creative Commons)

Beaghmore stone circles - © Robert Ashby via Geograph (Creative Commons)

"May the road rise to meet you. May the wind be always at your back."

Traditional Irish blessing

97Cave Hill Country Park & Belfast Castle, Belfast - 7.2km (4.5 miles)

Difficulty: Easy

Cave Hill is an iconic landmark in Belfast. The short but demanding route through this country park takes in caves, nature reserves and spectacular views of the city. The outcrop of Napoleon’s Nose is said to have inspired the giant in Jonathan Swift’s Gulliver’s Travels.
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45Derry City Walls walk, Derry - 1.6km (1 miles)

Difficulty: Challenging

Londonderry - Derry-Londonderry is the only walled city in Ireland and one of the best examples in Europe. Around a mile long, a walk around these 400 year old walls gives views over the city and the River Foyle. The walls vary between 12 and 35 feet wide and some sections have wheelchair access.
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66Slieve Donard, Mourne Mountains - 9.7km (6 miles)

Difficulty: Easy

The Mourne Mountains are the highest and most dramatic mountain range in Northern Ireland with Slieve Donard taking the title for Northern Ireland’s highest peak. Expect a pine forest then a walk along the Glen River on this tough mountain walk.
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95Sperrin Mountains and Beaghmore Stone Circles, County Tyrone - 57.9km (36 miles)

Difficulty: Moderate

The Sperrins are Northern Ireland’s largest mountain range and a designated Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. This route is a long distance trek through the region. Walkers can also get up close to Bronze age marvel the Beaghmore Stones.
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56The North Antrim Cliff Path - 7.7km (4.8 miles)

Difficulty: Moderate

Walk from Dunseverick Castle to The Giant’s Causeway, taking in some of the greatest cliff top and cove scenery in Europe. The walk finishes at the emblematic basalt stacks with views out to Islay and Jura. The route can be extended to include the rope bridge over the Atlantic at Carrick a Rede.
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If you are planning to take on any of these routes, the difficulty ratings are based on the terrain, rather than distance, so ensure everyone is able to manage both the path and distance.

Please remember some routes, especially those on hills and mountains will vary hugely depending on weather conditions, and become very challenging in winter. You should always take a map, compass and equipment suitable for the terrain and let someone know where you are going. For more help, have a look at our Beginner's Guides or Safety sections.

Did your favourite walk make the list? Tell us in the comments or join in on twitter with @itv100walks or @OSLeisure with the hashtag #100walks!

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